D.C. Public Charter Schools Teacher and Principal Receive Education Awards

Monday, May 11, 2009

 News Release

3333 14th Street, N.W.,  Suite 210
Washington, DC  20010
Phone: 202-328-2660
www.dcpubliccharter.com

For Immediate Release: May 11, 2009
Contact: Audrey Williams 202/328-2748
awilliams@dcpubliccharter.com

Washington, D.C. - Kathryn Procope's students at Maya Angelou Public Charter School say they have a burning passion for math because their teacher makes math "look easy and she has that math thing down pat." While Sarah Hayes' heart is still in the 5th grade math classroom at KIPP DC: KEY Academy, she pours her soul into the entire school serving as one of the highest performing school leaders in the country. Procope and Hayes are the first charter school recipients of education awards from the Washington Post. Procope received the Washington Post's 2009 Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher Award for public charter schools while Hayes won the Distinguished Educational Leadership Award given to school principals. This is the first time the awards have been given to public charter schools in the metropolitan area. The D.C. Public Charter School Board selected the nominees from area charter schools.

"The Board is pleased with the caliber of teachers and principals in our charter schools and the recognition from the Washington Post is a testament to that," said Tom Nida, D.C. Public Charter School Board Chair.

Procope has been a high school math teacher and department chair at Maya Angelou Public Charter School for five years. Her unique teaching style, where she models a love of mathematics and "struts" her mathematical know-how, helps her students to appreciate the skills needed to become proficient in mathematics. Her classroom is a virtual laboratory of best practices from creative differentiation strategies to a warm, positive climate where each student knows they can succeed. She patiently turns her students into math scholars by diagnosing where students are academically and then teaching at the appropriate level.

"My goal is to be able to explain math concepts and have the students see how much fun it really is," Procope said. "When students can explain to me in their own words how they apply the different math concepts - that's success."

The Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher Awards recognize 21 educators at public, private and charter schools throughout the Washington region. Each recipient receives a $3,000 award which is presented by the Washington Post Educational Foundation.

Sarah Hayes believes that a great education means building a partnership between parents, students and teachers. As principal of KIPP DC: KEY Academy, a 5-8th grade public charter school, Hayes and other staff members visit every new student in their home before the school year begins to talk about expectations of the staff, parents and student. Hayes encourages all of her teachers to innovate and bring out the best in every child.

While managing the day-to-day operations of her school, she mentors three other KIPP DC principals and the seven KIPP DC vice principals and principals in training. Changing the fate of one classroom, one grade, or one school of students is not enough for Sarah Hayes - she will not stop until the education system in the city and country are equal for every student regardless of race, income, or life circumstances. Every teacher, student, and person who walks through the doors at KEY Academy believes that every KIPPster, will go to college because of the strong school culture that Hayes nourishes.

"I measure success in two ways - how the students are faring in life after they leave KEY Academy, and of the students who started eight years ago, about 95 percent are graduating high school on time and 100 percent of those are applying to college," Hayes said.

The Distinguished Educational Leadership Awards are given to 19 principals from local school systems, including charter and private schools in the metropolitan area. The Washington Post recognizes those principals who go beyond the day-to-day demands of their position to create an exceptional educational environment. Each principal participates in a 5-day educational seminar and receives a trophy.

The D.C. Public Charter School Board currently oversees 59 public charter schools on 95 campuses, serving more than 25,000 students in every ward of the city.

 

3333 14th Street, N.W.,  Suite 210
Washington, DC  20010
Phone: 202-328-2660
www.dcpubliccharter.com

For Immediate Release: May 11, 2009
Contact: Audrey Williams 202/328-2748
awilliams@dcpubliccharter.com

Washington, D.C. - Kathryn Procope's students at Maya Angelou Public Charter School say they have a burning passion for math because their teacher makes math "look easy and she has that math thing down pat." While Sarah Hayes' heart is still in the 5th grade math classroom at KIPP DC: KEY Academy, she pours her soul into the entire school serving as one of the highest performing school leaders in the country. Procope and Hayes are the first charter school recipients of education awards from the Washington Post. Procope received the Washington Post's 2009 Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher Award for public charter schools while Hayes won the Distinguished Educational Leadership Award given to school principals. This is the first time the awards have been given to public charter schools in the metropolitan area. The D.C. Public Charter School Board selected the nominees from area charter schools.

"The Board is pleased with the caliber of teachers and principals in our charter schools and the recognition from the Washington Post is a testament to that," said Tom Nida, D.C. Public Charter School Board Chair.

Procope has been a high school math teacher and department chair at Maya Angelou Public Charter School for five years. Her unique teaching style, where she models a love of mathematics and "struts" her mathematical know-how, helps her students to appreciate the skills needed to become proficient in mathematics. Her classroom is a virtual laboratory of best practices from creative differentiation strategies to a warm, positive climate where each student knows they can succeed. She patiently turns her students into math scholars by diagnosing where students are academically and then teaching at the appropriate level.

"My goal is to be able to explain math concepts and have the students see how much fun it really is," Procope said. "When students can explain to me in their own words how they apply the different math concepts - that's success."

The Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher Awards recognize 21 educators at public, private and charter schools throughout the Washington region. Each recipient receives a $3,000 award which is presented by the Washington Post Educational Foundation.

Sarah Hayes believes that a great education means building a partnership between parents, students and teachers. As principal of KIPP DC: KEY Academy, a 5-8th grade public charter school, Hayes and other staff members visit every new student in their home before the school year begins to talk about expectations of the staff, parents and student. Hayes encourages all of her teachers to innovate and bring out the best in every child.

While managing the day-to-day operations of her school, she mentors three other KIPP DC principals and the seven KIPP DC vice principals and principals in training. Changing the fate of one classroom, one grade, or one school of students is not enough for Sarah Hayes - she will not stop until the education system in the city and country are equal for every student regardless of race, income, or life circumstances. Every teacher, student, and person who walks through the doors at KEY Academy believes that every KIPPster, will go to college because of the strong school culture that Hayes nourishes.

"I measure success in two ways - how the students are faring in life after they leave KEY Academy, and of the students who started eight years ago, about 95 percent are graduating high school on time and 100 percent of those are applying to college," Hayes said.

The Distinguished Educational Leadership Awards are given to 19 principals from local school systems, including charter and private schools in the metropolitan area. The Washington Post recognizes those principals who go beyond the day-to-day demands of their position to create an exceptional educational environment. Each principal participates in a 5-day educational seminar and receives a trophy.

The D.C. Public Charter School Board currently oversees 59 public charter schools on 95 campuses, serving more than 25,000 students in every ward of the city.